2012 Tormaresca "Masseria Maìme" Negroamaro Salento (Previously $30)

SKU #1268920 91 points Wine Enthusiast

 The nose is initially subdued but eventually reveals inviting aromas of spiced plum, leather, vanilla and a whiff of blue flower. The structured but elegant palate conveys blackberry, dried cherry, mint, savory herb and clove alongside bracing but fine-grained tannins and bright acidity. The lingering finish ends on a licorice note. Drink 2016–2023. (KO)  (3/2015)

90 points James Suckling

 A soft, fruity red with a plum, milk-chocolate and almond aftertaste. Full and delicious.  (11/2015)

90 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

 Here's a wine that gives ample room to varietal expression. The 2012 Negroamaro Masseria Maìme delivers a generous supply of dark fruit and dried cherry backed by oak-spice and toast. The wine is thick in consistency and powerful in intensity although the mouthfeel feels relatively light and unencumbered. Give it another year or two to flesh out further. (ML)  (8/2016)

K&L Notes

The Antinori Family created the Tormaresca label in 1998. It has two main wineries: Bocca di Lupo in the Castel del Monte and the Masseria Maime (think of it as the Maime Manor) along the Adriatic coast in Salento about 20 kilometers south of Brindisi. When I first tasted the 2012 Tormaresca Masseria Maime Negroamaro I was shocked at its elegance. Negroamaro can be a powerfully tannic variety at times; it frequently gets called “rustic.” Negroamaro grown in Salento’s limestone soils can produce wines of elegance if you manage the fermentation properly. The Tormaresca winemaking team fermented the grapes for 18 days using very delicate pump-overs looking for gentle extraction. Then they put the wine into a mix of French and Hungarian oak to age for one year. The nose is full of wild cherry, sage, earth and leather while on the palate you notice it is a structured wine, but elegantly balanced long and spicy. I think this wine is an excellent introduction to the Negroamaro grape. It takes you right to the top! (Greg St. Clair, K&L Italian wine buyer)

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Staff Image By: Greg St. Clair | K&L Staff Member | Review Date: 8/22/2017 | Send Email
Puglia used to be one of Italy’s least known regions, but its hundreds of miles of coastline, turquoise-blue waters, sun-bleached beaches, balmy weather, burgeoning wine culture and low prices all added up to a 2013 Wine Enthusiast magazine award as a Wine Travel Destination. Wine-wise Puglia is rather mysterious, with indigenous varieties adding an extra layer of complexity. Primitivo/ Zinfandel has some obvious recognition, but to most folks, Bombino Nero, Fiano Minutolo, Susamaniello, Uva di Troia, Malvasia Nera and another 20 or so Puglian grapes are just vowel fests. This month we’re going to see one of those more obscure varietals: Negroamaro. The Antinori Family created the Tormaresca label in 1998. It has two main wineries: Bocca di Lupo in the Castel del Monte and the Masseria Maime (think of it as the Maime Manor) along the Adriatic coast in Salento about 20 kilometers south of Brindisi. When I first tasted the 2012 Tormaresca Masseria Maime Negroamaro I was shocked at its elegance. Negroamaro can be a powerfully tannic variety at times; it frequently gets called “rustic.” Negroamaro grown in Salento’s limestone soils can produce wines of elegance if you manage the fermentation properly. The Tormaresca winemaking team fermented the grapes for 18 days using very delicate pump-overs looking for gentle extraction. Then they put the wine into a mix of French and Hungarian oak to age for one year. The nose is full of wild cherry, sage, earth and leather while on the palate you notice it is a structured wine, but elegantly balanced long and spicy. I
Drink from 2017 to 2025

Additional Information:

Varietal:

Other Red Wines

Country:

Italy

- Once named Enotria for its abundant vineyards, Italy (thanks to the ancient Greeks and Romans) has had an enormous impact on the wine world. From the shores of Italy, the Romans brought grapes and their winemaking techniques to North Africa, Spain and Portugal, Germany, France, the Danube Valley, the Middle East and even England. Modern Italy, which didn't actually exist as a country until the 1870s, once produced mainly simple, everyday wine. It wasn't until the 1970s that Italy began the change toward quality. The 1980s showed incredible efforts and a lot of experimentation. The 1990s marked the real jump in consistent quality, including excellence in many Region that had been indistinct for ages. The entire Italian peninsula is seeing a winemaking revolution and is now one of the most exciting wine Region in the world. For our entire Italian wine selection, click here. Click for a list of bestselling items from all of Italy.
Sub-Region:

Puglia

Alcohol Content (%): 13.5