2012 No Girls "La Paciencia Vineyard" Walla Walla Valley Grenache

SKU #1253996 95 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

 There are 298 cases of the 2012 Grenache La Paciencia Vineyard and it’s unquestionably the best vintage of this wine to date. Offering fabulous intensity in its strawberry, raspberry, spice, pepper and floral bouquet, this beauty hits the palate with medium to full-bodied richness, a supple, elegant texture and a seamless, lengthy finish. This wows with its purity and finesse-driven style more than for weight or richness, and it should evolve nicely given its overall balance. Drink 2016-2024. (JD)  (6/2015)

95 points Wine Spectator

 Supple, satiny, polished and expressive, layering plum, cherry and sassafras flavors onto an open-textured frame, gliding easily into a long and multilayered finish. Drink now through 2022. 298 cases made.  (8/2016)

94 points Wine Enthusiast

 Quite lightly colored, this wine displays perfumed aromas of green and black olive, stargazer lilies, mineral, peat and moist earth. The flavors are both ethereally light and rich, tingling the palate with seemingly endless savoriness. (SS)  (9/2015)

92 points Vinous

 (done entirely in neutral barrels and concrete): Moderately saturated pale red. Old World nose offers scents of raspberry, cranberry, smoke, flint, peony, rose petal and pink peppercorn. A juicy, pure wine with lovely precision and finesse, with the red berry flavors complicated by saline minerality; the mouthfeel here is distinctly Burgundian. Finishes with slightly edgy tannins and acidity but still offers considerable early appeal for its sheer verve. A fascinating Washington Grenache. Elizabeth Bourcier, who is "assistant vigneronne" at Cayuse, has recently taken over responsibility for the No Girls wines. She noted that the crop level here was just 1.2 tons per acre; the Paciencia vineyard is situated just north of Armada, in the Rocks district.  (11/2015)

K&L Notes

No Girls Wines was originally founded as a collaboration between Cayuse Vineyards' owner and vigneron Christophe Baron and general manager Trevor Dorland. As the project has evolved, we are very pleased to include other Cayuse employees including Cayuse assistant vigneronne Elizabeth Bourcier and controller Nancy Nestler. These team members prove that No Girls represents an appreciative nod to one of Walla Walla's richest and most colorful eras—it doesn't literally mean no girls. It means that by creating wines true to our valley, we're celebrating our history. Walla Walla Bordello The grapes come from the Cayuse La Paciencia vineyard, which means patience—appropriate since the project was ten years in the making. The vines are tightly spaced and planted on an angle, giving No Girls a personality all its own. These are serious wines, not Cayuse seconds. They're focused and pure—food friendly creations that eloquently express the rocky terroir from which they spring.

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Price: $139.99

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- Fat, ripe and rich with ample fruit and vibrant acidity, wines made from Grenache are easy to love. While its origins are still under dispute - some suggest Spain, where it is called Garnacha, while others say it came first from Sardinia, where it is called Cannonau - it is inarguably one of the most planted varietals in the world. A hearty grape, Grenache does well in hot, dry regions and its sturdy stalk also makes it well-suited to withstand blustery conditions like the Provençal Mistral. It ripens at relatively high sugar levels, which translates to higher potential alcohol in the wines it produces. Grenache may be most famous in the Southern Rhône areas such as Châteauneuf-du-Pape and Gigondas where it has long been an important component of delicious blends. But it's also the source of the crisp rosés from Tavel, Lirac and Provence, and age-worthy vins doux naturels like Rivsaltes and Banyuls. Grenache is also found in large swaths of northeastern Spain, in Navarre, in Rioja, where it plays a supporting role in blends with Tempranillo, and in the distinctive wines of Priorat. The grape was once the most widely planted varietal in Australia, though Shiraz and Cabernet have overtaken it. In California, Grenache plantings have dwindled from their heyday in the San Joaquin Valley, but it is starting to see a resurgence, albeit in smaller plantings, where other Rhône varietals thrive.

United States

- When people consider domestic wine, they normally think about the state of California. The fine viticultural Region within California, including the Napa Valley, Sonoma, Santa Cruz Mountains, Mendocino and Santa Barbara, are capable of growing grapes of world-class quality. But there's plenty of fabulous wine coming from other states, too. Oregon, Washington and New York are also causing eyebrows (and glassware) to be raised around the world. Click for a list of bestselling items from the United States.


- Washington has become one of the most important wine producing states in the United States, and development continues to grow rapidly. In 1969, when California was exploding as a wine producer, Washington had only two wineries, but by 2000 that number had passed 100. Most of Washington's grape crop goes to uses other than wine. Merlot and Chardonnay have been the most successful in Washington. It's interesting to note that Washington's prime wine regions are located at 46° north, along the same latitude as the legendary French wine districts of Bordeaux and Burgundy. During the summer, Washington averages more than two hours more sunlight each day compared to California.