2011 Antinori "Guado al Tasso" Bolgheri Superiore

SKU #1233450 95 points James Suckling

 A dense, layered red with asphalt, berry and clove character. Figs too. Full body, chewy tannins and a juicy finish. Needs time to soften. Better in 2017.  (11/2014)

95 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

 Forever the superstar, the 2011 Bolgheri Superiore Guado al Tasso is a delicious wine that never holds back in terms of intensity and seamless integration. Every detail has been finessed. The blend is 57% Cabernet Sauvignon, 25% Merlot, 15% Cabernet Franc and 3% Petit Verdot. Each vineyard parcel is fermented separately to maintain varietal identity. The wine’s appearance is dark and luscious with thick extraction and a vibrant dark garnet hue. Generous aromas of dark fruit, tobacco and chocolate lift steadily from the glass. The mouthfeel is soft and yielding with a great sense of tannic persistency that holds up the finish, which can be counted in many long minutes. Give this wine five years or more to fully evolve. (ML)  (10/2014)

95 points Wine & Spirits

 The 2011 Guado al Tasso is remarkably approachable for such a structured wine. Powerful yet refined tannins weave through flavors of blackberry, plum, black pepper, fennel and tobacco, providing structure without impeding flavor. The wine aged for 18 months in French oak barrels, including six months after blending. Silky and juicy, the flavors unfold in overlapping layers, spiraling upward with impressive energy and drive. Still fresh on the third day of tasting, this has a long life ahead even as it offers immense pleasure now.  (4/2015)

94 points Vinous

 The 2011 Guado al Tasso impresses for its balance and overall harmony. Silky and gracious, the 2011 is built on pure texture and balance. Plums, mocha, espresso and dark spices all blossom in the glass. The 2011 is all about texture persistence. Although the 2011 drinks well young, I also think it will develop nicely in bottle. (AG)  (9/2014)

92 points Wine Spectator

 Inky in color and flavor, with black currant and blackberry fruit, this is pure and focused, with well-integrated tannins and a saturated finish echoing the fruit. Best from 2016 through 2024. (BS)  (2/2015)

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Price: $89.99
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Varietal:

Cabernet Sauvignon and Blends

- Cabernet Sauvignon has come a long way from its role as a blending varietal, however dominant, in the wines of Bordeaux. Today it is the most planted red varietal in the world. Identified as a descendent of Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon Blanc, the late-ripening Cabernet Sauvignon needs to be planted in warmer climates to fully ripen. Its small berries can easily be identified for their distinctive blue color, thick skins and high tannins. And while the varietal has its own definitive characteristics: green pepper-like aromas and black currant flavors among them, it is perhaps most prized for its ability to convey terroir, vintage and winemaking. A relatively new varietal, Cabernet Sauvignon started making inroads into the wines of the Médoc and Graves in the late-18th century. Today it is also dominant in the up-and-coming Entre-Deux-Mers region of Bordeaux and can also be found in Southwest France. It is the companion varietal to Sangiovese in Italy's Super Tuscans and is planted all over Europe, stretching to lesser-known winegrowing regions like Russia and Lebanon. In the Americas Cabernet Sauvignon has found champions in every nook and cranny of California and among winemakers in Washington, where it complements plantings of Merlot. In South America, Cab thrives in Chile, but can also be found in smaller amounts in Argentina and even in Mexico.
Country:

Italy

- Once named Enotria for its abundant vineyards, Italy (thanks to the ancient Greeks and Romans) has had an enormous impact on the wine world. From the shores of Italy, the Romans brought grapes and their winemaking techniques to North Africa, Spain and Portugal, Germany, France, the Danube Valley, the Middle East and even England. Modern Italy, which didn't actually exist as a country until the 1870s, once produced mainly simple, everyday wine. It wasn't until the 1970s that Italy began the change toward quality. The 1980s showed incredible efforts and a lot of experimentation. The 1990s marked the real jump in consistent quality, including excellence in many Region that had been indistinct for ages. The entire Italian peninsula is seeing a winemaking revolution and is now one of the most exciting wine Region in the world. For our entire Italian wine selection, click here. Click for a list of bestselling items from all of Italy.
Sub-Region:

Tuscany