2011 Cayuse "God Only Knows" Walla Walla Valley Grenache

SKU #1180399 96 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

 The 2011 Grenache God Only Knows is shockingly good in the vintage. Sporting a big, masculine profile, with notions of lite gunpowder, ground pepper, herbs and wild strawberry and blackberry fruit, it flows onto the palate with medium to full-bodied richness, a full, rich mid-palate and a healthy dose of tannin that will require short-term cellaring to integrate. This knockout Grenache will be at its finest from 2016-2026. (JD)  (6/2014)

96 points Wine Enthusiast

 *Cellar Selection* Intensely aromatic, this carries a wealth of layered flavors consistent with past vintages. Umami, sea salt, mineral and Provençal herbs comingle, with a rich component of raspberry, plum and cherry compôte. More layers appear through the finish, with orange liqueur and a whiff of tanned leather.  (2/2015)

95 points Wine Spectator

 Supple, velvety, expressive and complex, layered with rocky minerality and beautifully expressive plum and guava fruit, deftly balanced to rocket through the long and vivid finish. Drink now through 2025.  (6/2015)

93 points Vinous

 Bright medium red. Wildly complex scents of red berries, smoked meat, iron, orange peel, flowers, pepper and olive tapenade. Fat, silky and pure, and not at all overly sweet, with distinctly soil-driven, Old World flavors of pureed wild strawberry, minerals, garrigue, truffle and smoke. A sexy carnal quality contributes to this wonderfully smooth wine’s appeal. Less liqueur-like than the typical ripe-year Chateauneuf du Pape; in fact, this wine hints at a tangy pinot quality. Finishes with lush, noble tannins and outstanding subtle length. (ST)  (12/2014)

Share |
Price: $129.99
Quantity:
Add To Waiting List

Real Time Inventory by location:

The item you have chosen is not in stock in our retail stores or within our main warehouse.

Product turnaround time varies by location of inventory and your chosen method of shipping/pickup. For a detailed explanation click here.

Additional Information:

Varietal:

Grenache

- Fat, ripe and rich with ample fruit and vibrant acidity, wines made from Grenache are easy to love. While its origins are still under dispute - some suggest Spain, where it is called Garnacha, while others say it came first from Sardinia, where it is called Cannonau - it is inarguably one of the most planted varietals in the world. A hearty grape, Grenache does well in hot, dry regions and its sturdy stalk also makes it well-suited to withstand blustery conditions like the Provençal Mistral. It ripens at relatively high sugar levels, which translates to higher potential alcohol in the wines it produces. Grenache may be most famous in the Southern Rhône areas such as Châteauneuf-du-Pape and Gigondas where it has long been an important component of delicious blends. But it's also the source of the crisp rosés from Tavel, Lirac and Provence, and age-worthy vins doux naturels like Rivsaltes and Banyuls. Grenache is also found in large swaths of northeastern Spain, in Navarre, in Rioja, where it plays a supporting role in blends with Tempranillo, and in the distinctive wines of Priorat. The grape was once the most widely planted varietal in Australia, though Shiraz and Cabernet have overtaken it. In California, Grenache plantings have dwindled from their heyday in the San Joaquin Valley, but it is starting to see a resurgence, albeit in smaller plantings, where other Rhône varietals thrive.
Country:

United States

- When people consider domestic wine, they normally think about the state of California. The fine viticultural Region within California, including the Napa Valley, Sonoma, Santa Cruz Mountains, Mendocino and Santa Barbara, are capable of growing grapes of world-class quality. But there's plenty of fabulous wine coming from other states, too. Oregon, Washington and New York are also causing eyebrows (and glassware) to be raised around the world. Click for a list of bestselling items from the United States.
Sub-Region:

Washington

- Washington has become one of the most important wine producing states in the United States, and development continues to grow rapidly. In 1969, when California was exploding as a wine producer, Washington had only two wineries, but by 2000 that number had passed 100. Most of Washington's grape crop goes to uses other than wine. Merlot and Chardonnay have been the most successful in Washington. It's interesting to note that Washington's prime wine regions are located at 46° north, along the same latitude as the legendary French wine districts of Bordeaux and Burgundy. During the summer, Washington averages more than two hours more sunlight each day compared to California.
Organic: