2004 Bodegas Numanthia-Termes "Numanthia" Toro

SKU #1025759 98 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

 Any aspiring collectors should add a case of this to their stash. The 2004 Numanthia comes from a different terroir with a different clone of Tinta de Toro. The vines for this cuvee range from 70-100 years of age with tiny yields of 1 ton of fruit per acre. The wine undergoes malolactic fermentation in barrel followed by 19 months in new French oak before being bottled unfined and unfiltered. The wine is a glass-coating opaque purple with a killer nose of mineral, pencil lead, wild blueberry, and blackberry liqueur that roars from the glass. On the palate the wine is full-bodied, dense, and already beginning to show complexity within its layers of spicy black fruits. There is immense power, well-concealed ripe tannin, and the well-delineated finish lasts for over one minute. This is a sensational effort which in a perfect world should be cellared for a decade and enjoyed over the following 25+ years. However, the elderly among us should not feel guilty about opening a bottle now. (JM)  (2/2007)

95 points Wine Spectator

 Rich and deep, but still holding back, this powerful red shows concentration and balance, offering cassis, blackberry and roasted plum fruit, with dark notes of mineral, smoke and earth and hints of licorice and spice, all wrapped in muscular but velvety tannins. (TM)  (11/2007)

94 points Wine & Spirits

 This is the second wine of Numanthia-Termes after the single-vineyard Termanthia, though I'd place it first for its wild blend of sage and sanguine aromas, a primitive and primary nose that's hard to resist. It's a selection from old vines, some over 100 years old. The wine's intriguing flavors evolve toward caramelized blueberries and sweet spices, combined with a robust wall of mineral tannins. This Toro's strength of character sets it up to evolve for a decade or more.  (10/2007)

93 points Stephen Tanzer's International Wine Cellar

 Dark violet. Spicy dark berry aromas are complicated by orange peel, cinnamon and clove. Medium-bodied black raspberry and cassis flavors are given an exotic accent by Asian spices and violet pastille. The silky tannins are almost overwhelmed by the wine's spicy fruit. Finishes brisk and long, with an echo of cracked pepper. (JR)  (9/2007)

Jancis Robinson

 Full, glossy, dramatic and sweet. Rich and round with dusty tobacco notes on the finish which stops the wine from being too sweet. Nice appetising kick. Finishes just a little suddenly. (JR)  (11/2006)

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Price: $99.99
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- A very important red grape varietal that's native to Northern Spain, grown across the north and central regions of the country. Low in acid and alcohol, with subtle strawberry, leather and tobacco notes, the grape responds well to oak aging and plays particularly well with others. Tempranillo is an important component, when combined with Garnacha, Mazuelo, Viura and Graciano, of Rioja, with the best examples coming for the cooler, higher-elevation regions like Rioja Alta and Rioja Alavesa. It is also grown in significant quantities in the Ribera del Duero where it is called Tinto Fino and Penèdes where it is called Ull de Llebre o Ojo de Llebre. Tempranillo hasn't gained a particularly strong foothold outside of Spain, achieving some success under the name Tinto Roriz in Portugal. There it is used as a component of Port and in the table wines of the Ribera del Duero and the Dão.


- With more land under vine than any other country in the world, Spain is the great sleeping wine giant. In recent years, a great deal of money and passion has been poured in the burgeoning Spanish wine industry, helping to improve quality among its vast array of wines from sparkling Cava to Sherry to Rioja Gran Reserva. The most important red-wine-producing regions are Rioja, Ribera del Duero and Navarra in the north and Priorat and Penedes in the northeast.