2006 Bonneau du Martray Corton-Charlemagne Grand Cru

SKU #1045805 94 points Allen Meadows - Burghound

 The '06 is more obviously riper than the '07 with a complex, ripe and elegant mix of green apple, spice and minerality that complements perfectly the round, rich, detailed and stony flavors that possess ample mid-palate fat and superb depth of material, all wrapped in a gorgeously long and drenching finish. A study in harmony and grace that should also age well for years.  (6/ 2009)

94 points Wine Spectator

 (Collectibles and Top 100 of 2009) A whiff of chalk dust, along with a vanilla note, introduces this intense white. Flavors of peach, grapefruit and oak spice persist through the finish, with a mineral streak. Powerful and balanced, with a lingering aftertaste. Best from 2011 through 2024.  (6/ 2009)

93 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

 Jean-Charles Le Bault de Martray has established a singular track record for wine from a single large parcel in the heart of the original Charlemagne vineyards of Corton. His distinctive methods typically include separate fermentation of each vineyard block; a year in barrel with late summer malolactic; and a full six months on the fine lees in tank, in which state I tasted his 2006 Corton-Charlemagne. An architect by training, Le Bault de Martray values -brightness, precision and proportionality- and it is easy to see those virtues exemplified in this wine, characterized by clarity, subtlety, firmness of structure, and sheer refreshment unusual for the vintage. Scents of fresh lime, heliotrope and white peach usher in a subtly-creamy yet persistently bright and juicy display of continued citrus, peach, and inner-mouth floral notes. Airy and elegant, this finishes almost delicately but tenaciously. Le Bault de Martray cautions that his Corton-Charlemagne virtually uniformly -shuts down- for several years soon after bottling. I would recommend planning on revisiting this 2006 in 3-5 years and it should repay at least an additional decade's bottle maturation. The palpable extract and depth of sweet-saline, savor in the 2005 put it in a similar league and in line for a similarly long life.  (6/ 2009)

17 points Jancis Robinson

 Sweet, tight nose. A little raw. Still very fresh and wild. Gritty texture. Very alive. But not nearly ready to charm. 17.5  (8/ 2009)

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 By: georgedi |  Review Date: 2/26/2010 
Whoa. First taste was like licking wet sidewalk. Eeesh. But then....a miracle. After a few hours...in the fridge no less...it softened and became deliciously complex. UTTERLY different than any New World chardonnay in my limited experience.

Additional Information:

Varietal:

Chardonnay

- It's hard to believe that up until about 30 years ago, this extremely popular varietal hid behind the veil of geographical names like Chablis and Puligny-Montrachet. Now grown all over the world and bottled by its varietal name, Chardonnay has achieved a level of branding unlike any other wine. Surprisingly, though, what you get when you buy Chardonnay can differ greatly from country to country and even within one country, depending on the climate where it's grown and how it is vinified and aged. From fresh, crisp and minerally with apple and lemon notes to rich and buttery with tropical fruit overtones, Chardonnay runs the gamut. In France's Burgundy, Chardonnay is the source of the prized wines of Chablis, Corton-Charlemagne, Mâcon, Meursault and Montrachet. It also the foundation of exceptional Champagne, where it is blended with Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier or vinified on its own into Blanc de Blancs. It is also extremely popular in California, and is gaining popularity in Australia, New Zealand, Italy, Spain and South Africa.
Country:

France

- When it comes to wine, France stands alone. No other country can beat it in terms of quality and diversity. And while many of its Region, Bordeaux, Burgundy and Champagne most obviously, produce wine as rare, as sought-after and nearly as expensive as gold, there are just as many obscurities and values to be had from little known appellations throughout the country. To learn everything there is to know about French wine would take a lifetime. To understand and appreciate French wine, one only has to begin tasting them. Click for a list of bestselling items from all of France.
Sub-Region:

Burgundy

- The province of eastern France, famous for its red wines produced from Pinot Noir and its whites produced from Chardonnay. (Small of amounts of Gamay and Aligoté are still grown, although these have to be labeled differently.) The most famous part of the region is known as the Côte d'Or (the Golden Slope). It is divided into the Côte de Beaune, south of the town of Beaune (famous principally for its whites), and the Côte de Nuits, North of Beaune (home of the most famous reds). In addition, the Côte Chalonnaise and the Mâconnais are important wine growing regions, although historically a clear level (or more) below the Côte d'Or. Also include by some are the regions of Chablis and Auxerrois, farther north. View our bestselling Burgundy.
Specific Appellation:

Corton

- The hill of Corton, an escarpment topped with a forest, overlooks the Grand Cru vineyard of Corton and the towns of Ladoix-Serrigny and Aloxe-Corton in the Côte de Beaune. This is the first area south from the town of Beaune. Corton is the sole Grand Cru red of the Côte de Beaune. The southeast portion of this vineyard produces Grand Cru white, and is called Corton Charlemagne. Famous Premier Cru vineyards are Corton Bressandes, Corton Renardes and Corton Clos du Roi.